7 Very Expensive Dog Breeds

A good dog is hard to find.

Okay maybe not hard, but sometimes expensive. While any dog that is yours is a great dog, some cost a lot of dough. These prices are average guesstimates for purebred puppies from reputable breeders.

Tibetan Mastiff: $3000 and up

Not only will this puppy cost you to acquire, but feeding him will drain most budgets. Mastiffs are big and boy do they eat a lot. The Tibetan Mastiff is from Central Asia and are said to be rugged and able to fend off predators while being friendly with children and loyal to their owners. One is said to have recently fetched, (sorry for the pun) 12 million Yuan which comes out to about $1.9 million in U.S. dollars. The report calls him a puppy at 200 pounds, which means either they have different meaning for “puppy” or that is going to one huge dog.

tibetan mastiff

©istockphoto/Young777


Dogo Argentino: $3900 and up

Sometimes called the Argentine Mastiff, they are also known for their bravery and loyalty to their families. Bred mainly for big game hunting, they were first bred in Argentina by Dr. Antonio Nores Martinez in 1928 using the now extinct Cordoba Fighting Dog and crossing it with Great Danes, Boxers, and many others. They are said to be great at hunting wild boars and one report has a Dogo Argentino killing a puma to save two young girls just recently.

dogo argentino

©istockphoto/Lunja


Chow Chow: $3000 and up

These dogs have hind legs that are practically straight and give them their distinctive stilted gait. They are aggressive dogs (I once frequented a veterinarian who refused new clients with Chows due to his concern about his hands being bitten). A dominant owner and good training can make them good pets as they are protective of children and can get along with other pets if they are raised that way from puppyhood. They are sensitive to heat and can sometimes snore when sleeping due to their short snouts.

chow chow

©istockphoto/JCLobo


Akita: $1500-$3000

Known as the national dog of Japan, owning one is considered good luck over there. They are highly intelligent, though they can become stubborn and aggressive if not trained properly. Hellen Keller brought the first Akita to the U.S. in 1938 after being given one by the Japanese government when she visited Akita prefecture. Akitas have been used for police and military work as well as sled dogs and hunting dogs.

akita

©istockphoto/Garosha


Bearded Collie: $1000 and up

In 1514 a Scottish shepherd is said to have bred a Polish Sheepdog with other herding and flock dogs such as a Komondor and Old English Sheepdog to come up with the Bearded Collie. The U.S. supposedly saw their first litter in 1967. Bearded collies make good hunting and obviously herding dogs and can weigh up to 60 pounds. They hate to be confined and do not do well when kept indoors, so make sure you have room for them to roam.

bearded collie

©istockphoto/s5iztok


Pharaoh Hound: $2500 and up

Traced as far back as 4000-3000 BC in ancient Egypt, these dogs are considered the oldest domesticated breed. They are good with children, though not so friendly to strangers. This dog actually blushes as their nose and ears will turn a deep shade of rose when they are excited.

pharoah hound

©istockphoto/Garosha


Portuguese Water Dog: $2000 and up

These puppies have only been in the U.S. since the early 1970s but have become very popular. They do have health issues and one reason their price is high is there are many expensive tests that each parent should undergo before they are used to breed. Their popularity has soared since President Obama and his family brought Bo home to the White House in 2008. Bo was joined in August of 2013 by Sunny, a female Portuguese Water Dog.

portuguese water dog

©istockphoto/suefeldberg

Meet the Author: Michael Ryan

Michael Ryan is a full-time musician along with a humor, travel and outdoor recreation columnist. He's also an avid skier and golfer and has traveled extensively around the U.S, the Caribbean and Europe. His musical career takes him all over the U.S. and his wife drags him everywhere else. His weekly columns “The Life of Ryan” ran in the Transcript and Sentinel newspaper chain for several years and have been featured in the Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News and Mile High Magazine. He is the co-founder, editor and humor columnist for ColoradoLocalLegends.com and currently resides in Morrison, Colorado.

Frequently Asked Questions about Puppies Pt 2
A Home for Every Dog