Suggestions for Putting Weight on a Skinny Dog – Part I

Suggestions for Putting Weight on a Skinny Dog – Part I

Posted by on Feb 6, 2015 in our roundups | 0 comments

When your dog resembles a skeleton, it might be time for an intervention. Although obesity is far too common in dogs today; there are also dogs with the opposite problem. In fact, some dogs are downright skinny and I know; I have one of those dogs. But I know why my dog is thin; he’s active, runs and plays hard, and is always ready to go. Here are some things I’ve learned as I live with this dog and try to keep weight on him. Talk to Your Veterinarian Your dog’s veterinarian is your partner in your dog’s health care so talk to your vet before you make any changes regarding your dog’s weight. Ask your vet to perform a complete physical as there are a number of diseases or health issues that can affect weight loss (or gain) as well as appetite. You’ll want to eliminate these prior to beginning a weight gain program. In addition, ask your veterinarian for a goal weight for your dog. Create a Journal While helping my dog, Bones, an English Shepherd, gain and then maintain his weight, one of the best pieces of advice I was given was to create a journal for him. I keep track of his daily meals and treats, his exercise, and his weight. With everything recorded in the journal, then if his weight changes at the next weigh-in, I can look back and see what happened during the week. A journal helps a lot. Weigh Your Dog Most weight loss or gain programs for people recommend weekly weigh-ins and the same applies to your dog. A once a week weigh-in is great as it allows you to chart any gains, losses or weight maintenance over time. Weighing more often won’t help and will likely drive you crazy. If you weigh in too often you’ll start focusing on every calorie or every play session and that’s not good for you or your dog. Weekly weigh-ins are fine. Choose a Quality Dog Food Helping a healthy but thin dog gain weight requires creating an eating program that focuses on increasing your dog’s nutrition rather than simply adding calories. Too many calories too quickly could cause digestive upsets that might include vomiting and/or diarrhea. Adding too much fat could cause digestive issues, too, including inflammation of the pancreas. The best food for your dog is one made with meats, eggs, vegetables, and fruits while avoiding cereal grains, by products and meat meals. If your dog doesn’t have any  grain allergies, I’d recommend The Honest Kitchen’s Revel or Keen. If your dog is intolerant to grains, Embark and Love are also good options for finding a delicious, but also nutritious food your dog will enjoy. Also keep in mind that the feeding guidelines for these foods are just suggestions. If your dog seems to still be hungry you can always increase their...

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