Can Dogs Eat Cinnamon? Benefits and How Much Is Too Much

Yep, they sure can! Adding cinnamon to food, whether it’s in a meal or in a treat, is perfectly safe for your pooch — as long as it’s the right kind of cinnamon.

In the U.S., there are two types of cinnamon widely available: ceylon cinnamon and cassia cinnamon.

Ceylon Cinnamon is safe for dogs because it has low levels of coumarin, a natural chemical compound found in many plants. Coumarin is toxic in large doses for both dogs and humans. Cassia Cinnamon has much higher levels of coumarin than Ceylon Cinnamon, so steer clear of it for your pooch.

Is Cinnamon Good or Bad For My Dog? Daily Dosages To Remember

As with any supplement, proper dosage (along with using the right cinnamon type) must be followed in order to achieve results and avoid negative health effects.

Ground cinnamon daily dosage (based on your dog’s weight)

  • 1-10 pounds: A small pinch to 1/8 teaspoon
  • 20-50 pounds: 1/4 to 1 teaspoon
  • 50-100 pounds: 1 to 2 teaspoons
  • 10-20 pounds: 1/8 teaspoon to 1/4 teaspoon
  • Over 100 pounds: 2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoon

There’s such a thing as too much of a good thing. Start your dog off slowly, increasing the amount over time until the appropriate dosage is reached.

Benefits of Cinnamon for Dogs

There’s nothing like the smell of cinnamon that envelopes a home and announces: “There’s something fresh and tasty baking in this kitchen!” Humans love the taste and smell of cinnamon (unless, of course, it’s that stupid dare where you have to eat a whole spoon of cinnamon at one sitting).

The good news is that our dogs can also partake in all of this spice’s goodness. A sprinkle of powder into your dog’s meal not only adds flavor but also offers a myriad of medicinal benefits. Here’s an overview:

    Reduces Inflammation

    If your dog has arthritis or inflammation that affects their mobility, eating cinnamon can help manage their joint pain and reduce swelling.

    Helps Manage Dog Diabetes

    Cinnamon is prized for lowering blood sugar levels by limiting the amount of sugars that enter the bloodstream after eating. It can also improve sensitivity to insulin, all of which helps diabetic dogs struggling with insulin resistance.

    Fights the Spread of Bacteria, Viruses, and Fungi

    Cinnamon has potent compounds that can inhibit the growth of bacteria like Listeria and Salmonella and prevent or fight viral infections.

    Offers Antioxidants

    Antioxidants shield your dog’s body from damage by things like inflammation, pollution, smoke and fumes, and sun exposure. Cinnamon is packed with powerful antioxidants such as polyphenols.

    Relieves Digestive Discomfort

    The next time your dog has an upset stomach or more serious digestive issue, cinnamon could help soothe their side effects, including nausea, heartburn, gas, and vomiting.

    May Improve Brain Function

    Studies in mice have shown that consuming cinnamon reduces brain cell damage, protects neurons, and improves motor function.

    Alternative For Dogs That Suffer From Allergies

    If your dog is allergic to cinnamon, you may be wondering how else you can tantalize your dog’s palate or boost their nutrient intake. Check out these other herbs and spices that are safe for dogs:

    • Ginger
    • Turmeric
    • Rosemary
    • Basil
    • Parsley

    Watch Out For Nutmeg

    It’s easy to get cinnamon and nutmeg confused. Nutmeg is another popular, delicious spice that’s used liberally on many fall and winter desserts like pumpkin pie, sweet potatoes, and eggnog. However, what’s natural isn’t always safe for your pup.

    Nutmeg contains a toxin called myristicin that’s dangerous to dogs when consumed in large amounts. According to Pet Poison Helpline, it’s unlikely that a dog would eat enough to get sick from most recipes with nutmeg in them. That said, it’s a good idea to read about the signs and symptoms of toxic exposure in dogs when you’re giving your dog a new food.

    Some Dog-Friendly Cinnamon Foods Your Dog Will Love

    We’re fans of cinnamon at The Honest Kitchen. Be sure to check out some of our customers’ favorite products, each made with a delicious dash of cinnamon:

    Meet the Author: Amy Tokic

    Amy Tokic is the Editor of Petguide.com, the flagship site to over 70 different pet communities, which offers pet parents a one-stop-info-shop for all things dog and cat related. Amy's been with PetGuide since the beginning, guided by the wisdom of her Shih Tzu mix and furry roommate, Oscar. Together, this pet power couple has their paw on the pulse of the pet industry, sniffing out trends, advice, news, tasty treat recipes and other tail-wagging stories.

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